Exchange BPA is not the only fruit.

So we all love the ExchangeBPA, don’t we? And we all had a bit of a panic when it looked like MS had decided not to bother including one for Exchange 2013, yes? (the beta of the new exchange 2013 BPA is here, if you missed it). But there are many other analyzers included with Windows 2008 R2 and Windows 2012 (not 2008, though). Here’s a quick pictorial guide on how to run them, and get output in a form that you can use. hopefully.

How to run a Best Practice Analyzer.

In Windows 2008 R2 click the start button and search for server manager:

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In windows 2012 you can click the server manager tile in the start screen.

Start servermanager.msc, and navigate to the role you wish to check. Click on “scan this role”:

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And in a few minutes, (quite a few, occasionally) you will get your result:

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Double clicking an item ,or selecting “properties” with an item highlighted, will bring up further details:

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Unfortunately, it is not possible to print out a whole report via the GUI. To do this requires some powershell magic.

 

How to dump BPA output to HTML.

Start powershell with administrator rights by going to start | all programs | administrative tools | windows powershell modules and right clicking to select “Run as administrator”

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Type:

import-module ServerManager

Import-module BestPractices

Get-BPAModel

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In the example above there is only one role installed that has a BPA option.

To run the BPA type invoke-BPAModel <model id>

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To convert the output to HTML type Get-BPAResult –BestPracticesModelId <model id> | ConvertTo-Html –As List –CssUri$env:windir\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules\BestPractices\BestPracticesReportFormat.css >  <path to HTML report file>

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Note this is all one line, there is a  space between –CssURI and $env and there is a “>” between the path to the .css file and the output filename.

The output should look something like this:

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A little playing around would produce a script that could be run once every month or so with task scheduler, that would email the resulting html file to you.

There a lots of other things you can do with BPA here:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd759206.aspx

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